Urban Forestry TAEP Program

 

TENNESSEE URBAN FORESTRY COUNCIL

IN COLLABORATION WITH THE

TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
DIVISION OF FORESTRY

T A E P
Tennessee Agricultural Enhancement Program
GRANT INFORMATION

Tree

Community Tree Planting Projects on Public Land
Cities | Towns | Counties
Community Organizations Non-Profit Organizations

CLOSING DATE FOR PROPOSALS: June 07, 2019

Key Information

  • All grant contracts will start on November 1, 2019 and end on April 30, 2020.
  • Riparian tree planting on public or private land is available for funding with TAEP funds.
  • Tree labels for an arboretum or outdoor classroom can be purchased using TAEP funds.
  • Title VI training is required for all applications.
  • In an effort to fund more projects if proposals exceed available funds, maximum grant funds on Irrigation Devices will be $15/device and $150 for Signage.
  • Eligible expenses to be reimbursed are the cost and shipping of trees, contracted planting, mulch, irrigation devices, tree labels and signage for FY 2020. Any other expenses not covered under the grant, cannot be used for match.
  • Tree species with a maturing height between 20-40 feet are allowed under TAEP, but can only consist of 25% of the total submitted project. Projects with a higher percentage will be evaluated on a case by case basis.
  • Private Non-Profit land with public access can be planted using TAEP funds.
  • Certain species of trees will not be funded. See species list on page 7.
  • Upon completion of the tree planting, all sites will be visited and inspected by a TUFC Representative to affirm tree numbers, species, location, and proper planting.
  • ANY ITEMS PURCHASED OR INVOICED OUTSIDE OF THE CONTRACT DATES WILL NOT BE REIMBURSED

General Information

Introduction

The TAEP (Tennessee Agricultural Enhancement Program) grant fund for community tree planting is provided by the 2008 State Legislature to the Tennessee Department of Agriculture. This year’s tree planting program is the result of a cooperative effort between the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Division of Forestry (TDF), and the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council (TUFC). The program will be administrated by TUFC in collaboration with TDF. All grant contracts will be by and between the grantee and TUFC.

Goal and Objective

The goal of TAEP community tree planting grant is to increase the tree resource base in cities and towns across the State of Tennessee. It is NOT to provide beautification. Trees are work horses for our communities, providing energy savings through shading, storm water mitigation, rain interception, and air quality improvement through filtration and absorption. These are direct cost saving benefits to communities. Beautification should not be used as an objective for a TAEP tree planting project.

Definition of Tree and Shrub

Tree – a woody plant with a single trunk, or multiple trunks capable of growing to a height of 15 feet or more.
Shrub – a woody plant with a multiple stem growing to a height of up to 15 feet.

TAEP grants are for the planting of trees that will mature at a height of at least 20 feet or more.
Any tree with a mature height below 20 feet is NOT eligible for funding. Eligible Grantees
Grants may be awarded to:

  • cities and towns
  • other local units of government
  • approved non-profit organizations such as neighborhood associations, civic groups, and community volunteer tree groups
  • Elementary, secondary educational and higher learning institutions

Available Funds

Eligible applicants may apply for grants up to $20,000.

Technical Assistance

Potential grantees are encouraged to seek assistance in developing their grant proposals. Sources of assistance include Division of Forestry personnel, arborists, nurserymen, horticulturists, consulting urban foresters, landscape architects and other specialists in related fields.

If the project is going to involve a specialist, please include a letter from him/her to prove they are aware of their commitment.

Eligible Expenses

The following are eligible expenses for grant and match.

  • cost of trees
  • mulch
  • shipping
  • contracted labor to plant trees
  • acknowledgement sign
  • irrigation devices
  • tree labels

ANY ITEMS PURCHASED OR INVOICED OUTSIDE OF THE CONTRACT DATES WILL NOT BE REIMBURSED

Tree Labels

With the growth of the arboretum program administered by the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council (TUFC), the urban staff is accepting grant proposals for the purchase of tree labels for an arboretum or outdoor classroom.

Planting Locations

The intent of TAEP grant funds is to increase tree canopy on public land but trees can be planted elsewhere. TAEP funds can be used to plant on Private Non-Profit lands that has public access. Special consideration is also given toward private property that is frequently used for community events. Riparian areas are also acceptable planting locations for TAEP funds.

Riparian Buffer

A riparian buffer is the transitional area between land and water that contains a mix of trees, shrubs, grasses and wildflowers. This vegetated strip of land “buffers” a waterway from human impacts. The function of a riparian buffer is to stabilize the banks of a waterway, create habitat, filter stormwater pollutants, and provide flood storage.

The urban staff in an effort to mitigate stormwater, improve terrestrial and aquatic life, stabilize the banks of waterways, and improve water quality is accepting grant proposals to plant trees in riparian buffers on public and private lands. Eligible grantees remain cities & towns, Non-Profits, and institutions of higher learning. A riparian buffer consists of an area within a 35 foot zone extending out from the bank of a waterway. Individual landowners do not qualify for this program.

The Tennessee Urban Riparian Buffer Program began with a federal grant from the USDA Forest Service to reclaim and protect eight defined watersheds within Davidson County. Over a three year span almost 28,000 trees were planted with nearly 2,800 volunteers within 30,451 feet of buffer along waterways. At the conclusion of the project the Tennessee Urban Riparian Buffer Handbook was produced. An online copy is available at: https://bit.ly/TURBhandbook

(CASH 50-50 MATCH) Requirements

TAEP community tree planting grants require a match equal to the grant (Cash 50-50 match).
Match will be allowed for trees, shipping, purchased mulch, contracted planting, acknowledgement sign, and irrigation devices only. Grantees can use volunteer labor or city crews to plant, but the value or cost can NOT be included as match. Here are some examples.

Example #1 Example #2 Example #3
Cost of Trees $5000 Cost of Trees $5000 Cost of Trees $5000
Cost to contract plant $3000 *Cost for city crews to plant $3000
Reimbursement $2500 Reimbursement $4000 Reimbursement $2500
  Example #4

Example #5

 
Cost of Trees

$5000

Cost of Trees $5000
Mulch

$500

*Value of donated mulch $200
Shipping

$500

Shipping $400
Cost to contract plant

$3000

* Value of Volunteer Planting time $2000

Reimbursement

*Unallowable Expense

$4500

Reimbursement $2700

A one year guarantee is NOT eligible for reimbursement. If the project includes a one year guarantee, the costs for tree replacement, watering, or other maintenance are not an allowable cost.

ANY ITEMS PURCHASED OR INVOICED OUTSIDE OF THE CONTRACT DATES WILL NOT BE REIMBURSED

Review

Proposals will be reviewed and ranked by the Division of Forestry’s Urban Forestry Staff and the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council. Projects to be funded will be recommended to the State Forester for final approval.

Proposals will be rated on:

  • General project merit and completeness of the application.
  • Financial documents, such as completeness budget and accuracy of the math.
  • Technical aspects of the application, including the planting map, appropriate species, soil considerations, maintenance and watering plan, and planting specifications.

Reporting Requirements

  • Complete Title VI Pre-Award Survey and submit with application.
  • Complete a W-9 Form and submit with your application.
  • Complete the Supplier Direct Deposit Form to the address on the form. DO NOT INCLUDE WITH YOUR APPLICATION.
  • A final report on the planting project is due when Grantee submits request for reimbursement.

Grant recipients are subject to periodic and post – completion inspections, reviews, and audits by
The Tennessee Department of Agriculture Division of Forestry, The Tennessee Urban Forestry Council and the Tennessee Comptroller’s Office.

ALL PLANTINGS WILL BE INSPECTED BY THE TENNESSEE URBAN FORESTRY COUNCIL FOR COMPLIANCE WITH SPECIES, LOCATION AND PROPER PLANTING TECHNIQUE.

Reimbursement

ANY ITEMS PURCHASED OR INVOICED OUTSIDE OF THE CONTRACT DATES WILL NOT BE REIMBURSED

Funds are reimbursed after completion and Inspection of the project AND all invoices are submitted, not at the time a contract is signed. An interim payment may be made if the grantee can demonstrate a dire need for a partial reimbursement. To receive reimbursement, a grantee must submit:

  • Detailed invoice as outlined in the standard state contract (invoice template will be provided)
  • Detailed invoice(s) of tree purchases, planting costs if planting was contracted, shipping, mulch, irrigation devices, tree labels, and signage.
  • Summary expense form (will be provided)
  • Invoices & work must be dated within the contract dates

A grantee will be reimbursed 50% of the cost of purchasing trees, shipping, mulch, irrigation devices, contracted labor, tree labels, and acknowledgment sign.

Title VI Compliance

A Title VI Pre-Award Survey found in the Title VI Packet must be completed and submitted with your application.

SPECIES OF TREES NOT FUNDED

Green & White Ash- Emerald Ash Borer
Leyland Cypress- seridium canker (West Tennessee only) Hemlock- Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
American Elm- The threat of Dutch Elm Disease (resistant varieties can be used)
Silver Maple- undesirable urban species Bradford Pear- undesirable urban species

PROJECT APPLICATION DETAILS

Urban TAEP Grant Contracts are for tree planting in cities, towns and communities across Tennessee. The goal of the program is to bolster local tree planting efforts to increase the urban tree resource canopy.

For successful tree planting projects, attention must be paid to the planting site. Applications should describe the conditions of the site and the soil where the trees will be planted. As an example, consider most mall trees or most parking lot trees, these trees are typically planted in soils so compacted; they never grow to their full potential and often fail to survive more than 15 years. If the project under consideration has these or similar conditions, a plan for site modification should be included.

Grantees are required to follow the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Forestry Division’s tree planting guidelines and practices. A shortened version is attached to the back of this information packet.

Grantees are required to use Tennessee grown trees. Evidence of trees grown in-state can be provided by submitting an invoice of an in-state nursery at the time of grant reimbursement. Trees must also meet the minimum ANSI Z-60.1- 2014 American Standard for Nursery Stock.

Citizen Oversight – To help ensure that State tax dollars are spent effectively and efficiently, each grantee will appoint a committee of at least 3 citizens from the community. These committee members may be existing local tree boards. Individuals who have a direct interest in purchasing or planting trees cannot serve on this local committee.

All projects must provide an acknowledgment of the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Division of Forestry and the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council. All projects must provide an acknowledgement sign placed at the planting site that states, “This tree planting project was completed by (your local community name) in collaboration with the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council with funding by the Tennessee Agricultural Enhancement Program as provided by the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Forestry Division.” The sign may be removed after 3 years.

All plantings must be watered for one growing season during dry periods. Watering during years 2
& 3 must be planned for as well. Who will undertake the watering must be identified.

All applications proposing to use trees larger than 2” caliper must explain why larger stock is needed. “Because the plan calls for them” is not a justification.

In addition, the application must include all the items in the next section entitled FORMAT FOR PROPOSALS.

All projects must provide a letter from any person who is expected to assist in completing the project. This letter acknowledges that the individual has been contacted and is aware of his/her anticipated participation in the project.

Timetable

April 30, 2019 Tennessee Urban Forestry Councils TAEP Announcement Letter will be sent to potential applicants Urban TAEP Grant Information Packet & Application available on website.
June 7, 2019 Urban TAEP Grant Applications acceptance closes at 5:00 pm EST. All Applications MUST BE RECEIVED electronically by this time.
June 28, 2019 Applications will be reviewed by Tennessee Urban Forestry Council  and Division of Forestry Urban Forestry Staff
July 8, 2019

“Not accepted” letters will be mailed

Prospective Grantees will be contacted by TUFC

August 1, 2019 Urban TAEP Grant Contracts will be written and electronically sent to Grantee
September 13, 2019 Urban TAEP Grant Contracts, signed by grantee must be received by the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council no later than 5:00 pm EST (address of acceptance will be provided).
November 1, 2019 Beginning date of Urban TAEP Grant Contract
March 30, 2020 Planting of bare root seedlings must be completed
April 15, 2020 Planting of balled & bur lapped must be completed
April 30, 2020  

Ending date of Urban TAEP Grant Contract

 

May 31, 2020

Last day to accept Urban TAEP Grant Contract Invoices for reimbursement A final report on the planting project is due when Grantee submits request for reimbursement.

ANY ITEMS PURCHASED OR INVOICED OUTSIDE OF THE CONTRACT DATES WILL NOT BE REIMBURSED

Submitting an Application

Application must be SUBMITTED ELECTRONICALLY via (TAEP Grant Application) by 5:00 p.m. EST on Friday, June 07, 2019. Faxed or emailed materials will NOT be accepted.

For assistance, please call or email:

TUFC Executive Director
Mike Dorsey
615-638-8027
info@TUFC.com

Tree Planting Guidelines
Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Forestry Division

NOTE: TREES PLANTED USING A GRANT FROM THE DEPT OF AGRICULTURE FORESTRY DIVISION MUST FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES.
In order to have a healthy tree in the future; the tree must be planted properly. The following are guidelines to assist you in planting your tree properly. Prior to planting remember to move the tree by the root ball or the container. Never grab it by the trunk.

  1. Digging the Hole: The planting hole should be at least twice the width of the rootball or container to encourage the roots to grow into the surrounding soil. The sides of the planting hole should be sloped. The depth of the hole should be the same as the distance from the root flare of the tree to the bottom of the container or ball. Most trees have the root ball below the top of the ball or soil in the container, so digging a hole the same depth of the ball or soil in the container often results in planting the tree too deep. One can check the root flare depth by digging down next to the trunk to find the flare.
  2. Tree Preparations: For container trees, remove the container. Place the root “ball” in the hole. Cut the circling roots in the outer part of the ball with 4 to 6 cuts, or gently pull the roots out of the ball and plant them in trenches leading away from the planting hole. (A planting hole does not have to be round.) For B&B trees, place the ball in the hole, then remove the rope around the trunk, and then reach down in the hole and cut away as much burlap as possible. Also, use wire cutters to remove as much of the wire basket as possible. This should be done after the tree is in its final position and ready to be back filled.
  3. Backfill: Use the same soil that was taken out of the hole. If the soil is very poor and appears to need topsoil, increase the hole size and sparingly mix in some local topsoil (avoid using potting soil, peat moss, and soil amendments). Remove stones and other debris. Fill the hole halfway with backfill, then water. Finish filling the hole with the backfill and water again. Make sure to work the soil around the ball firmly to eliminate any air pockets. Also, make sure the tree is vertical and properly supported, but do not pack the soil around the trunk.
  4. Mulch: The area around the tree should be mulched with woodchips, barkchips, or pine mulch. The mulch should be 3 to 4 inches thick and cover the entire planting area and beyond. The mulch needs to be placed in a donut or tire shape around the trunk of the tree. The mulch must be kept away from the trunk of the tree to keep insects away and prevent the trunk from being excessively wet. Mulch helps conserve soil moisture, reduces the competition from unwanted weeds, keeps lawn mowers and string trimmers from damaging the trunk, and moderates soil temperature extremes. Do not use sawdust, black plastic, or grass clippings as mulch. Do not make mulch volcanos.
  5. Trunk Wraps: Research indicates there are no benefits from using trunk wraps and it may encourage damaging insects or diseases.
  6. Staking: Staking is not necessary if the tree has a proper size rootball and has not been pruned too high. Stakes may help prevent lawnmowers and string trimmers from damaging the tree. If staking is needed for support, attach them so the tree has some sway. NEVER leave wires or straps on the tree for more than one growing season.
  7. Fertilizing: Generally new trees do not need fertilizers. Using the wrong product could damage the already reduced root system. Fertilize the first year only if a specific problem develops.
  8. Pruning: Prune only the branches that are dead, broken or severely deformed during the first growing season. Buds produce hormones that stimulate root growth, so keep the removal of buds to a minimum.
  9. Timing for Planting: The best time of year to plant your tree is November through March.
  10. Tree Size: Trees 2 inch caliper or less are recommended unless a larger size is justified. Smaller trees recover from transplant shock and commence with normal growth more quickly.